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Submitted: 14 Mar 2020
Accepted: 11 May 2020
ePublished: 12 Jul 2020
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Health Promot Perspect. 2020;10(3): 200-206.
doi: 10.34172/hpp.2020.33
  Abstract View: 95
  PDF Download: 65
  Full Text View: 17

Original Article

Using multi theory model (MTM) of health behavior change to explain intention for initiation and sustenance of the consumption of fruits and vegetables among African American men from barbershops in Mississippi

Jaelrbreiret L. Williams 1 * ORCID logo, Manoj Sharma 1 ORCID logo, Vincent L. Mendy 2 ORCID logo, Sophia Leggett 1, Luma Akil 1, Samuel Perkins 3

1 Department of Behavioral & Environmental Health, School of Public Health, Jackson State University, Jackson MS, USA
2 Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Jackson State University, Jackson MS, USA
3 Department of Business Administration, College of Business, Jackson State University, Jackson MS, USA
*Corresponding Author: Jaelrbreiret L. Williams, Email: jaelrbreiret@gmail.com

Abstract

Background: African American men have poorer health outcomes compared to their white counterparts despite medical advancements and early detection of diseases. The purpose of this study was to determine to what extent the constructs of the multi theory model (MTM) explain the intention for initiation and sustenance of the consumption of fruits and vegetables among African American adult men in Mississippi.

Methods: Using a cross-sectional design a valid and reliable paper survey was administered during November and December of 2019. The target population for the study consisted of African American adult men (18 or older) that had not consumed recommended levels of fruits and vegetables within 24 hours of taking the questionnaire. A convenience quota sample of African American men from select barbershops in Jackson, Mississippi, were asked to complete the 40-item questionnaire on preventive health screening behavior (n=134).

Results: The mean total number of fruits and vegetables consumed by participants within 24hours of the taking the survey was 1.63 (SD =1.47). The mean intention to initiate consuming 5or more cups of fruits and vegetables per day score was 2.13 (SD=1.17) as measured on a 5-point scale (0-4). Behavioral confidence (β = 0.495, P<0.0001), and changes in physical environment(β = 0.230, P<0.0001) accounted for 40.8% of the variance in predicting the intention to initiate behavioral change regarding the daily consumption of fruits and vegetables. Practice for change (β = 0.462, P<0.001) and emotional transformation (β = 0.215, P<0.0001) accounted for 37.5% of the variance in the intention to sustain fruits and vegetables consumption behavior.

Conclusion: Based on data found in the study, MTM appears to predict the intention to initiate and sustain fruit and vegetable intake of African American men. Further research studies of suitable interventions to target African American men are needed.

Keywords: Fruit, Vegetables, African Americans, Mississippi, Behavior
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