Submitted: 26 Jul 2015
Accepted: 08 Mar 2016
First published online: 31 Mar 2016
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Health Promot Perspect. 2016;6(1):1-9.
doi: 10.15171/hpp.2016.01
PMID: 27123430
PMCID: PMC4847108
  Abstract View: 889
  PDF Download: 1176
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Systematic Review

Pertinence of the recent school-based nutrition interventions targeting fruit and vegetable consumption in the United States:a systematic review

Christopher R. Aloia 1, Taylor A. Shockey 1, Vinayak K. Nahar 2,3 * , Kathy B. Knight 1

1 Department of Nutrition and Hospitality Management, University of Mississippi, 108 Lenoir Hall, PO Box 1848, University, MS 38677, USA
2 Department of Health, Physical Education, and Exercise Science, Lincoln Memorial University, Mary Mars, 6965 Cumberland Gap Parkway, Harrogate, TN 37752, USA
3 Department of Health, Exercise Science & Recreation Management, The University of Mississippi, 215 Turner Center, PO Box 1848, University, MS 38677, USA

Abstract

Background: Schools are the major locations for implementing children’s dietary behavior related educational or interventional programs. Recently, there has been an increase in school-based nutrition interventions. The objective of this systematic review was to overview the evidence for the effectiveness of school-based nutrition intervention on fruit and vegetable consumption.

Methods: PubMed was used to search for articles on school-based nutrition interventions that measured students’ fruit and vegetable consumption. Our search yielded 238 articles.The article was included if published in a peer-reviewed journal, written in English language,administered in the United States, and conducted among a population-based sample of children in Kindergarten through eighth grade. A total of 14 publications met the inclusion criteria.

Results: Eight articles successfully showed the positive effect on increasing fruit and or vegetable consumption while the other six did not. Several factors, including (but not limited to) intervention duration, type of theory used, style of intervention leadership, and positively affecting antecedents of fruit and vegetable consumption were compared; however, no dominant factor was found to be shared among the studies with significant findings. Given that the criteria for selection were high, the lack of consistency between interventions and positive outcomes was surprising.

Conclusion: With high levels of scrutiny and budget constraints on school nutrition, it is imperative that more research be conducted to identify the effective intervention components.

Citation: Aloia CR, Shockey TA, Nahar VK, Knight KB. Pertinence of the recent school-based nutrition interventions targeting fruit andvegetable consumption in the United States: a systematic review. Health Promot Perspect. 2016;6(1):1-9. doi: 10.15171/hpp.2016.01.
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