Submitted: 28 Jun 2016
Accepted: 09 Aug 2016
First published online: 01 Oct 2016
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Health Promot Perspect. 2016;6(4):180-184.
doi: 10.15171/hpp.2016.29
PMID: 27766234
PMCID: PMC5071784
  Abstract View: 538
  PDF Download: 486
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Original Article

Executive function influences sedentary behavior: A longitudinal study

Paul D. Loprinzi 1 * , Allison Nooe 1

1 Physical Activity Epidemiology Laboratory, Department of Health, Exercise Science and Recreation Management, The University of Mississippi, University, MS 38677, USA

Abstract

Background: No study has evaluated the effects of executive function on follow-up sedentary behavior, which was this study’s purpose.

Methods: A longitudinal design was employed among 18 young adult college students (Mage = 23.7 years; 88.9% female). Accelerometer-determined sedentary behavior and physical activity, along with executive function, were assessed at baseline. Approximately 8 weeks later, re-assessment of accelerometer-determined sedentary behavior and physical activity occurred. Executive function was assessed using the Parametric Go/No-Go (PGNG) computer task. From this, 2 primary executive function outcome parameters were evaluated, including the Simple Rule and Repeating Rule.

Results: After adjusting for baseline sedentary behavior, age, gender, body mass index and baseline moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), for every 25% increase in the number of correctly identified targets for the Repeating rule at the baseline assessment, participants engaged in 91.8 fewer minutes of sedentary behavior at the follow-up assessment (β = -91.8; 95% CI: -173.5, -10.0; P = 0.03). Results were unchanged when also adjusting for total baseline or follow-up physical activity.

Conclusion: Greater executive function is associated with less follow-up sedentary behavior.

Citation: Loprinzi PD, Nooe A. Executive function influences sedentary behavior: a longitudinal study. Health Promot Perspect. 2016;6(4):180-184. doi: 10.15171/hpp.2016.29.
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